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Four Dimensions of Spiritual Work

In any genuine, spiritual enterprise there are four dimensions of work towards Soul creation:


1. Work on oneself


Before contemplating work on oneself, a period of preparation is needed that involves a gradual realization, to some degree, of one's own 'nothingness'. I must begin to clearly see and feel my fundamental imperfections, the inner chaos, which is often disguised by fervent attempts to appear 'successful'.

 

For most westerners who live in comfort and wealth, broaching the feeling of nothingness is almost impossible unless there is a strong predisposition to seek reality or community conditions that support such. Otherwise, most people need 'life shocks' - such as trauma, illness, injury or moral failure - before the Ego can give way enough for the yearning of reality to be revealed.

 

When a decision has been made to embark on Soul creation, a long period of engagement with general and specific spiritual exercises is needed that allow observation of 'How I work'.


True work on oneself begins when enough observational material has been accumulated, and appropriate understanding derived, that supports a direction of work to balance the functions of the organism (such as the harmonization of thoughts, emotions, posture). This is work in the lower part of the Soul.


2. Work with others


The first dimension of work (work on oneself) is the easiest to grasp - at least initially - as it directly involves the functions of only oneself. On the other hand, the second dimension is much more difficult as understanding needs to expand to include a 'sense of others'.


The hallmark of working with other people is to constantly seek a relationship that enables work to be possible. This is not straight forward as being 'in relationship' is very different to functional development.


For example, functions are time limited but relationships are timeless. I am always 'in relationship' with someone irrespective if they are in my presence or not. If I 'hate' or 'love' someone, my relationship with them, to varying levels, is constantly one of 'hating' or 'loving'.


If they are present, I'm just more cognizant of the relationship, for better or worse. If they are not present, this relationship moves to the background but it remains like an immovable object.


But when there is an active work with others, for work to be possible, the relationship must be alive and unencumbered. I must constantly strive to see how I relate to them and them to me. I need to be nimble inside to seek the most suitable conditions that enable a working relationship.

 

As soon as I imprison the person I come in contact with by their historical relationship to me - shackled by former associations - I condemn them and myself to a predictable outcome - 'history repeats'. To negate this, every time we meet to work with each other, I must make the effort to 'begin again', to renew our possibilities in fellowship.

 

If work with others is conducted properly, all one's psychic and intuitive functions - all one's 'hidden senses' - are engaged that support the development of the middle part of the Soul.


3. Work for the Work


While I work on myself and work with others, I can also find my 'place' in an ecology of spiritual work that can support my own.


At a rudimentary level, this might range from financial contributions to an organization, event or project to active participation in ensuring that a minimum support structure is sustained for the spiritual enterprise or community. The lower and middle parts of the Soul are, or can be, engaged here at different scales.

He that believeth on me, as the scripture hath said, out of his belly shall flow rivers of living water. John 7:38 (KJV)

The most important 'work for the work' is that work that can support the 'network of inner lives' - that is, 'seeing' what is needed to support a quality of energy that can enliven and promote a community of work.


4. Work of Working


This dimension of work is truly creative. I must be able to constantly 'see' and 'do' to that extent that a seamless integration of all the dimensions of work become a whole, mutually reinforcing each other in a singular direction under the guidance of one's own 'I'.

And thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength: this is the first commandment. Mark 12:30 (KJV)

The inner work required to sustain many functions and relationships simultaneously - facilitated by a Coherency of Being - and to 'listen', 'sense', 'see' and 'do' what is needed under the guidance of 'I' - powered by sexual or creative energy - belongs to the higher part of the Soul. In essence, one's life becomes work, one's work becomes life.

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